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POLAND: New deals for investment in railway infrastructure

posted onJune 30, 2017
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Polish railway infrastructure operator PKP PLK plans to sign deals for infrastructure modernization worth PLN 67 billion (EUR 15.9 bn) by the end of 2019. “I am 100% convinced that we will contract the entire [EU financed] perspective within the next two years. That is by 2019, including 2019, we will certainly contract [everything],” the company's CEO Ireneusz Merchel said as quoted by Railwaypro.com

The deals would be a part of the National Railway Program (KPK), the largest investment programme in railways in Poland that has ever occurred. The Program, adopted by the the Polish government in 2015 and co-financed by the European Commission, aims to upgrade Poland’s railway infrastructure by 2023 with investments worth PLN 67 billion (EUR 15.9 billion)

So far this year PKP PLK has signed deals worth over PLN 10 bn (EUR 2.4 bn) and plans to sign deals worth up to PLN 20 billion (EUR 4.8 bn) by the end of this year, the CEO added.

According to Warsaw Business Journal, the company is even planning to sign deals that are not included in the KPK. “At the moment, we are executing feasibility studies for schemes worth about PLN 16 billion (EUR 3.8 billion), which are not in the Program,” Merchel added.

PKP Polskie Linie Kolejowe S.A. was founded in 2001 after dividing Polskie Koleje Państwowe (national rail operator) into several separate companies to meet European Union Standards. PKP PLK is responsible for maintenance of rail tracks, conducting the trains across country, scheduling train timetables and management of railway land. According to the company's website, PKP S.A. has 2,500 railway stations at its disposal, of which nearly 600 are active. In 2015 the company put four innovative system stations (ISS) into service: in Ciechanów, Mława, Nasielsk and Strzelce Krajeńskie Wschód. Investments connected with the construction of innovative railway stations are financed fifty-fifty from PKP’s own funds and the state budget’s grant-in aid.